ABOUT MARK STEGEMAN

Mark Stegeman - TUSD Governing Board Member

Biography

Mark Stegeman grew up in northern California, attending public schools, playing the clarinet badly, and working in a sheet metal fabrication plant after school and during holidays, mostly as a machine operator. After graduating from the local junior college, he completed his junior and senior years at Pomona College, where he graduated Magna cum Laude with a double major in mathematics and economics. Mark received his Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one of the top schools in Economics in the world in that field. He taught at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at Virginia Tech before joining the faculty of the Eller College of Business at the University of Arizona.

 

While at Virginia Tech, Mark was part of a team of engineers, economists, and other experts who advised Hughes Telecommunications on satellite projects. As a longtime owner of commercial property and apartments, Mark has business experience and knows the practical importance of controlling costs.

As a tenured professor at the University of Arizona, Mark has taught introductory economics and intermediate microeconomics to large undergraduate classes, and game theory (the study of strategic decision making) to small Ph.D. classes. He also serves on the university-wide General Education Committee.

"I firmly believe that TUSD can again become a great district, one that is a point of civic pride and enables students to reach their full potential. I also believe that restoring the strength of America’s public education system, including large traditional school districts, is critical for our future economic strength. A well-educated population is one of our essential economic and moral resources."

Mark became part of the Tucson Unified School District family when the board appointed him as a charter member of the district’s audit committee. He attended scores of board meetings before running for the board in 2008. He was reelected in 2012 by a wide margin.

about1On the TUSD Board, Mark has been a tireless advocate for academic excellence. “I firmly believe that TUSD can again become a great district, one that is a point of civic pride and enables students to reach their full potential,” he says.

“I also believe that restoring the strength of America’s public education system, including large traditional school districts, is critical for our future economic strength. A well-educated population is one of our essential economic and moral resources.”

Mark is running for his third term on the TUSD Board in November 2016. Be sure you are registered to vote through the Pima County Recorder’s Office.

Mark's 100 Day Plan

  • (1)

    LISTEN TO FAMILIES, EMPLOYEES, AND TAXPAYERS: (a) assess needs and concerns of employee groups, through anonymous surveys; (b) conduct 360° evaluations of all departments; (c) form internal and external working groups on specific issues; (d) ask the community for suggestions.

  • (2)

    BRING ORDER TO CLASSROOMS. Provide regular training in fair and effective classroom management. Support teachers’ statutory rights to remove disruptive students. Give principals more options for progressive discipline for repeat offenses..

  • (3)

    REDUCE TEACHER VACANCIES AND TURNOVER by adopting annual stipends for special education and other positions that are hard to fill or require special certification, and for teaching at challenging schools.

  • (4)

    REDUCE K-1 CLASS SIZES. The first years of school set critical foundations for literacy and success in learning.

  • (5)

    SET AGGRESSIVE CLASSROOM SPENDING TARGETS and restore public disclosure of how the instructional budget is spent. Higher classroom spending can fund smaller class sizes, higher teacher salaries, and adequate resources including textbooks and supplies.

  • (6)

    STREAMLINE THE TOP LEVEL OF ADMINISTRATION. Internal and external review will guide changes in the organizational chart, for directors and above, including elimination of unnecessary positions.

  • (7)

    GIVE SCHOOLS MORE FREEDOM in resource allocation, by giving principals a discretionary budget, a fixed amount plus an amount for each additional student above a base level.

  • (8)

    REVIEW AND IMPLEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FROM MANAGEMENT AUDITS that the current board majority has mostly ignored. These recommendations can improve effectiveness and reduce costs.

  • (9)

    IMPROVE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY by restoring the independence of the audit committee, hiring an internal auditor who reports to the board, and making all department and school budgets public before the Board approves the budget.

  • (10)

    STRENGTHEN MIDDLE SCHOOL OPTIONS by restarting the plan to attach an open admission high-standards middle school to University High School. The current board stopped the plan initiated by the 2012 board and has offered no alternative.

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